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Dog Spaying and Neutering

Neutering or spaying your dog is an important consideration for the health of your pet. Having your pet spayed or neutered can have long-term health and behavioural benefits. It is also the most effective way of controlling overpopulation and preventing the unexpected commitment of a litter of puppies. Responsible owners understand that spaying and neutering is an essential part of pet care. Not only does the procedure eliminate the risk of producing unwanted animals, but your pet will behave better in the long run and less prone to roaming away from home. Spayed and neutered pets can also avoid certain diseases, including malignant breast tumors and testicular cancer.

Why is it important to neuter/spay my dog?

Spaying or neutering your dog can help prevent certain health issues from developing. Spaying females before their first heat cycle can dramatically reduce their chances of breast or mammary cancers, eliminate uterine or ovarian cancers and diseases. Neutering your male dog will eliminate the chances of testicular cancers and diminish the likelihood of prostatic cancers, also help prevent dominant or aggressive behaviours. Spaying and neutering are the best way of preventing the overpopulation of animals.

How old should a dog be before they are neutered/spayed?

The time of spaying or neutering your dog can vary on the breed size of your dog. We recommend spaying for small breed canines around 6 months of age, while larger breeds can be spayed later, around 7 to 8 months of age. Neutering of male dogs can be done as early as 8 weeks of age, but the majority of pet owners wait until at least 6 months of age. Females can be spayed at around the same age, although it is best to have it done prior to their first heat.

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